Congress Taken Over By Progressives (heres the lists)

WIKIPEDIAS LIST OF PROGRESSIVES IN CONGRESS AND THE SENATE

Two fallacies in this group’s wording: progressive & fairness. Redistributing wealth from those who produce to those who have not developed the skills to adequately support themselves, is not progress & not fair. Economic growth isn’t helped by taking money from the people who create value & giving it to others. For one thing, it takes away incentive to better yourself. Free enterprise is based upon rewards & liberty.

 

The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) is the largest caucus within the Democratic caucus in the United States Congress with 83 declared members, and works to advance progressive issues and positions.

The CPC was founded in 1991 and currently has more than 80 members. The Caucus is co-chaired by Representatives Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ) and Lynn Woolsey (D-CA). Of the 20 standing committees of the House, 10 are chaired by members of the CPC.

Supporting organizations

The non-profit organization most closely associated with the Congressional Progressive Caucus is the American Progressive Caucus Policy Foundation which works to connect the caucus to progressives outside the Congress.

In addition, an array of national liberal organizations work to support the efforts of the progressive caucus, including the Institute for Policy Studies, The Nation magazine,* MoveOn.org, National Priorities Project, Jobs with Justice, Peace Action, Americans for Democratic Action, and Progressive Democrats of America. Also co-sponsoring the kickoff event were the NAACP, *ACLU, Progressive Majority, League of United Latin American Citizens, Rainbow/PUSH Coalition, *National Council of La Raza, Hip Hop Caucus, Human Rights Campaign, Association of Farmworker Opportunity Programs, and the National Hip Hop Political Convention.

House members

*Ed Pastor (AZ-4, Phoenix)Raúl Grijalva (AZ-7, Tucson) – Co-Chair

 **California

Lynn Woolsey (CA-6, Santa Rosa) – Co-Chair

George Miller (CA-7, Richmond) – Chairman, House Education and Labor Committee

Barbara Lee (CA-9, Oakland) – Chairwoman, Congressional Black Caucus

Pete Stark (CA-13, Fremont)

Michael Honda (CA-15, San Jose)

Sam Farr (CA-17, Monterey)

Henry Waxman (CA-30, Los Angeles) – Chairman, House Energy and Commerce Committee

Xavier Becerra (CA-31, Los Angeles)

Judy Chu (CA-32, El Monte)

Diane Watson (CA-33, Los Angeles)

Lucille Roybal-Allard (CA-34, Los Angeles)

Maxine Waters (CA-35, Inglewood)

Laura Richardson (CA-37, Long Beach)

Linda Sánchez (CA-39, Lakewood)

Bob Filner (CA-51, San Diego) – Chairman, House Veterans Affairs Committee

 

Jared Polis (CO-02, Boulder)

 

Rosa DeLauro (CT-3, New Haven)

 

Corrine Brown (FL-3, Jacksonville)

Alan Grayson (FL-8, Orlando)

Alcee Hastings (FL-23, Fort Lauderdale)

 

Hank Johnson (GA-4, Lithonia)

John Lewis (GA-5, Atlanta)

 

Mazie Hirono (HI-2, Honolulu)

 

Bobby Rush (IL-1, Chicago)

Jesse Jackson, Jr. (IL-2, Chicago Heights)

Luis Gutierrez (IL-4, Chicago)

Danny Davis (IL-7, Chicago)

Jan Schakowsky (IL-9, Chicago)

Phil Hare (IL-17, Rock Island)

 

André Carson (IN-7, Indianapolis)

 

Dave Loebsack (IA-2, Cedar Rapids)

 

Chellie Pingree (ME-1, North Haven)

 

Donna Edwards (MD-4, Fort Washington)

Elijah Cummings (MD-7, Baltimore)

 

John Olver (MA-1, Amherst)

Jim McGovern (MA-3, Worcester)

Barney Frank (MA-4, Newton) – Chairman, House Financial Services Committee

John Tierney (MA-6, Salem)

Ed Markey (MA-7, Malden)

Mike Capuano (MA-8, Boston)

 

Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick (MI-13, Detroit)

John Conyers (MI-14, Detroit) – Chairman, House Judiciary Committee

 

Keith Ellison (MN-5, Minneapolis)

 

Bennie Thompson (MS-2, Bolton) – Chairman, House Homeland Security Committee

 

William Lacy Clay, Jr. (MO-1, St. Louis)

Emanuel Cleaver (MO-5, Kansas City)

 

Frank Pallone (NJ-06)

Donald Payne (NJ-10, Newark)

 

Ben R. Luján (NM-3, Santa Fe)

 

Jerry Nadler (NY-8, Manhattan)

Yvette Clarke (NY-11, Brooklyn)

Nydia Velázquez (NY-12, Brooklyn) – Chairwoman, House Small Business Committee

Carolyn Maloney (NY-14, Manhattan)

Charles Rangel (NY-15, Harlem) – Chairman, House Ways and Means Committee

José Serrano (NY-16, Bronx)

John Hall (NY-19, Dover Plains)

Maurice Hinchey (NY-22, Saugerties)

Louise Slaughter (NY-28, Rochester) – Chairwoman, House Rules Committee

 

Mel Watt (NC-12, Charlotte)

 

Marcy Kaptur (OH-9, Toledo)

Dennis Kucinich (OH-10, Cleveland)

Marcia Fudge (OH-11, Warrensville Heights)

 

Earl Blumenauer (OR-3, Portland)

Peter DeFazio (OR-4, Eugene)

 

Bob Brady (PA-1, Philadelphia) – Chairman, House Administration Committee

Chaka Fattah (PA-2, Philadelphia)

 

Steve Cohen (TN-9, Memphis)

 

Sheila Jackson-Lee (TX-18, Houston)

Eddie Bernice Johnson (TX-30, Dallas)

 

Jim Moran (VA-8, Alexandria)

 

Peter Welch (VT-At Large)

 

Jim McDermott (WA-7, Seattle)

 

Tammy Baldwin (WI-2, Madison)

Gwen Moore (WI-4, Milwaukee)

Non-voting

Senate members

Former members

Sherrod Brown (OH-13) – Elected to Senate

Julia Carson (IN-07) – Died in December 2007

Lane Evans (IL-17) – Retired from Congress

Eric Massa (NY-29) – Resigned in March 2010

Cynthia McKinney (GA-4) – Lost Congressional seat to current caucus member Hank Johnson

Major Owens (NY-11) – Retired from Congress

Nancy Pelosi (CA-8) – Left Caucus when Elected House Minority Leader

Hilda Solis (CA-32) – Became Secretary of Labor in 2009

Stephanie Tubbs Jones (OH-11) – Died in 2008

Paul Wellstone (MN Senate) – Died in plane crash in 2002

Robert Wexler (FL-19) – Resigned in January 2010 to become President of the Center for Middle East Peace and Economic Cooperation

Bernie Sanders (Vermont)

Tom Udall (New Mexico)[2]

Roland Burris (Illinois)

Donna M. Christensen (Virgin Islands)

Eleanor Holmes Norton (District of Columbia)

WisconsinWashingtonVermontVirginiaTexasTennesseePennsylvaniaOregonOhioNorth CarolinaNew YorkNew MexicoNew JerseyMissouriMississippiMinnesotaMichiganMassachusettsMarylandMaineIowaIndianaIllinoisHawaiiGeorgia **Florida ConnecticutColoradoCaliforniaArizona

All members are members of the Democratic Party or caucus with the Democratic Party. There are currently 82 total declared Progressives including 79 voting Representatives, 2 non-voting Delegates, and 3 Senators.

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